Temporary Signs

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Cross-cultural confusion from a congenital curmudgeon.

October 18, 2014 at 11:09pm
6 notes
Reblogged from shosugita

from Collected Poems - Asymptote →

shosugita:

New translations of Hirato Renkichi are out on Asymptote. Listen to a recording of “Contact” on the website!

(via uglyducklingpresse)

11:00pm
50 notes
Reblogged from poetrysince1912
poetrysince1912:

While driving home from the brewery
one night this man from Quebec heard a radio program
about purple martins & the next day he set out
to build them a house
in his own back yard. I’ve never built anything,
let alone a house,
— From Srikanth Reddy's Fundamentals of Esperanto

I don’t know if I want to read the rest of a poem that seems to say all it might need to in the lines in this section.

poetrysince1912:

While driving home from the brewery
one night this man from Quebec heard a radio program
about purple martins & the next day he set out
to build them a house
in his own back yard. I’ve never built anything,

let alone a house,

— From Srikanth Reddy's Fundamentals of Esperanto

I don’t know if I want to read the rest of a poem that seems to say all it might need to in the lines in this section.

October 8, 2014 at 6:52pm
0 notes

Hit The Road, Jack [Take 2] - Tommy Emmanuel & Igor Presnyakov

I’m halfway through and this is already great.

(Source: youtube.com)

September 29, 2014 at 11:36pm
32 notes
Reblogged from bobulate

Stillness in motion →

bobulate:

I think a lot about what I would say to the younger version of myself if I met her again, if I met her through the still moments of all the motion of youth — when she was sitting at the piano, or if I saw her alone on the playground, or if I watched her read, voice quivering, her short stories in…

September 28, 2014 at 11:23pm
0 notes

Telephone Project →

Some of these poems really hit the spot. Very nice

5:58pm
1 note

Joe Hill's Last Will: a new recording by John McCutcheon →

THIS IMPORTANT MAYBE. Joe Hill may have been the only songwriter to really get a non-musical movement singing and his songs are fading away. Hill wrote lots and lots of parodies and John plans to record several of them with the accompaniment that would have suited that music at that time… up to an including a big band. It’s not cheaply done but it will be fantastic.

McCutcheon is a 7-time GRAMMY nominee and more importantly my boss (I am his office manager and part-time roadie). EVEN MORE importantly that that, he his my wife’s stepfather. He’s an all-around good guy, the best hammered dulcimer player you’ve ever heard as well as being among the best banjo-,guitar-,autoharp-players… look an ALL AROUND good guy, okay. And a great performer.

There is no better time and no better person to make this recording. I’M JUST SAYING that when John put out a Woody Guthrie covers album a few years ago it included Tommy Emmanuel, Kathy Mattea, Tim O’Brien, Stuart Duncan, and Willie Nelson among the guest performers. This is the best chance we have to give that level of treatment to Joe Hill’s songs. 

Please order an advance copy and fund the bejaysus out of this campaign so that it can get made in the way it needs to. We are at around $10k while I write this, with $20k to go, and 20 days to do it in. That’s a mere $1000 dollars per day.

Please approach strangers in your streets. Grab hold of both shoulders and stare deeply into their (frightened) eyes. Tell them, “John McCutcheon is doing a Kickstarter for a Joe Hill album.” And then move on. There are lots of strangers and lots of streets. This will presumably work.

September 27, 2014 at 4:44pm
4,162 notes
Reblogged from amandapalmer

One reason that people have artist’s block is that they do not respect the law of dormancy in nature. Trees don’t produce fruit all year long, constantly. They have a point where they go dormant. And when you are in a dormant period creatively, if you can arrange your life to do the technical tasks that don’t take creativity, you are essentially preparing for the spring when it will all blossom again.

— Marshall Vandruff (via neil gaiman via jonathan carroll)

THIS.

- Mike

(via learnhowtoadult)

What if instead of technical tasks you just got good at some particular phone game where you slide things? WHAT KIND OF SPRING can you have then?

(Source: amandapalmer, via learnhowtoadult)

September 23, 2014 at 11:32pm
10 notes
Reblogged from thephony

thephony:

You Were on My Mind | Tim O’Brien (via thebluegrasssituation)

THIS MAN. Good lord, he’s just the best. 

'Tis Tim! And a fine goatee! And a fine Ome banjo (I think!)

September 12, 2014 at 7:30am
134 notes
Reblogged from kierongillen

It is apparent Milgram assuaged participants’ concerns by making them believe in a noxious ideology—namely, that it is acceptable to do otherwise unconscionable things in the cause of science."

Stephen Reicher, a professor at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, said the implications were far-reaching.

It showed that ordinary people could commit acts of extraordinary harm, but that thoughtlessness was not the main motivator, he said. “We argue that people are aware of what they are doing, but that they think it is the right thing to do,” he said.

“This comes from identification with a cause—and an acceptance that the authority is a legitimate representative of that cause.

— 

Researching actually looking into the papers of the famous Milgram experiment (i.e. someone applying increasing fake-shocks to an actor, and many people continuing even after that person appears to be dead.)

Trad reading is that people will just follow authority figures (The Banality of Evil argument). This research would seem to suggest something else - namely the above.

(Via Warren.)

This is pretty much what I already thought the traditional interpretation of this experiment already was. Surprised to find that it is not.

September 11, 2014 at 7:53am
2 notes
Reblogged from chaptersbooks
chaptersbooks:

Four Great Plays by Anton Chekhov, translated by Constance Garnett (Bantam 1968). #translationthurs

chaptersbooks:

Four Great Plays by Anton Chekhov, translated by Constance Garnett (Bantam 1968). #translationthurs